Another Project Management Game Added to The Crowd Training Game Pack

Designed, developed, and published another project management learning game on my The Crowd Training Games pack. This game is based on travelling to different locations and answering questions at each stop. The questions for the first set are all based on the Project Quality Management knowledge area of the 5th edition of the Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK). Now that I have the base structure and all the gameplay figured out, I can create multiple versions of the game for the other nine knowledge areas, as well as create updated versions of the game for the 6th edition of the PMBOK once that is formally released.

Currently, the 30 day access to The Crowd Training Games pack for $30.  This newest game release brings the number of games in the pack to 17 games. Since I am working on a full 6th edition project management professional PMP certification exam prep course in addition to more games to include in The Crowd Training Game pack, I am offering a 90 day access and a lifetime access for less than the 30 day access so you may get more games over time. The 90 day access is offered for a limited time for $23 and the lifetime is $25. Obviously, these won’t remain at that price for too long. But since I am just rolling out the new website and the new games, I thought I would extent generous pricing to my early adopters. Thanks and enjoy! Visit: https://www.thecrowdtraining.com/games to start playing!

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My Windows Phone Experiment Comes to an End

Today, I bury my Windows phone. I jumped on it when it launched. I wanted something new. Similar to when I jumped on the iPhone when it launched. Sadly, no matter how much I wanted Windows phone to succeed, it failed in the long run.

Today, I got an *gulp* Android phone. It was the last phone OS I had not jumped to yet. I figured it was time to give it a try.

Galaxy S8 64GB (Verizon)

I got my new Samsung Galaxy S8+ in Orchid Gray. It is slick. It is bright. And fast. All of which I noticed in the first few seconds of turning it on. My HTC M9 running 8.1 had some of the elements… once. But over time it has dulled and slowed. If HTC would have been willing to at least allowed the device to upgrade to Windows 10 mobile, I may have stuck with it longer. Alas, they failed to stay current. As consequence, I was left behind on an island. Like a manufacturing town where the primary business has left town and all that is left are the few operations struggling to stay afloat. A few once great businesses that are no longer receiving any investments or updates. Like a Kmart in Flint, Michigan.

kmart

I have tried to hold out as long as possible. Trying to remain loyal and proud of device that makes up less than 1% of the market share. I hoped. I was optimistic. I scouted the websites of https://www.windowscentral.com/ and https://www.thurrott.com/ and others regularly for some glimpse of hope. Maybe a spark of light far off in the future in the form of a rumor to entice me to stay a little longer. But no. Nothing coming from Microsoft that gave me any hope of hanging on.

If anything, the more I read, the more I got the impression that Microsoft too had given up on their experiment.  All the news from Microsoft was about their efforts on Android and iPhone. Even in those rare occasions where they did anything on Windows Mobile, it was not for my 8.1. The abandonment was tiresome. I was all out of hope. I was out of contact. My HTC was well past 2 and a half years. It was failing. The Camera would not load. The volume button frequently decided not to cooperate. The few apps I had were hit or miss. Oh, the apps…

The first time opening the Google Play store on my S8 was an overwhelming experience. There were apps for everything. When I did a search for an app… it was there! There were no sacrifices required. If I wanted it, it was there and more.  Not like the annoying situation of a conference I spoke at recently where the guide and everything else was only available on other mobile systems. I could not even see my session’s evaluations. And in one session, the presenter bragged about a service being available “on every device!” Yeah, just not Windows phone, Blackberry, or even my Amazon Fire tablet.

One of the first apps I downloaded was the Microsoft To-Do app [see my review]. I have found Wunderlist to be one of my favorite productivity apps/programs. Since the intent is to sunset Wunderlist in favor of To-Do, I figured it makes sense to only download one of the two. Trying my best not to be stuck on another obsolete island.

After 6 years, today I officially claim end to my Windows Phone experiment.

 

Added Another Project Management Game

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In my effort to give more options to those studying for the Project Management Professional – PMP – exam, I have developed and uploaded another PMP game. This one helps you test your knowledge of the terms in the glossary of the Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge or PMBOK. I used the 5th edition glossary to author the game, but most of the terms carry over to the 6th edition of the PMBOK. Once the 6th edition is formally released, I shall update the handfuls of terms requiring updating. Since my games are offered in an online repository of games you get all the versions of my games throughout your subscription period – so you are set whether you are planning to sit for the 5th edition or the 6th edition of the PMP exam or simply looking for fun ways to improve your knowledge and gain PDUs!

In this game, you are presented with three doors. One door is the correct door with the correct project management term according to the PMBOK glossary [note: some other project management references may define the terms differently].

The game randomly selects 15 glossary terms from the pool of 378 terms created for the game. There is a counter in the bottom right hand corner to let you know how many you have answered. At the end of the 15, you are provided your overall score. I choose 15 terms in each set to not overwhelm you each time you play but give you enough in one term to see how you do. Let me know your thoughts if that amount should be adjusted. I can easily change it or offer options.

If you want to download and own the Project Management Definition Game, click here to purchase the game for $12.

If you want to gain access to this game and the dozen other games currently offered (with more arriving all the time), then click here to subscribe. For a limited time, the normal $39 rate for 90 day access can be reduced to $14.50 using The Crowd Training’s coupon code opening50 when checking out.

Discounted 5th Edition PMP Exam Questions Course to $10

For those needing to get a few more Project Management Professional (PMP) certification exam questions before sitting for the real PMP exam, I created a course featuring some of best PMP exam questions along with my advice.

udemy-pmp-course-cover

Instead of just having a learner take a 100 questions, I also:
– introduce each knowledge area and provide some pointers
– draw out with my hand drawings and explain each of the process in the knowledge area
– give you an knowledge area concentrated exam
– debrief and provide tips on each and every question

Since this was made with 5th edition questions, I decided to cut the price from $75 to $10.  PMI is changing the PMP exam to reflect the update to the Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) to a 6th edition in Q1 of 2018, this 5th edition focused practice exam course may be obsolete by the end of 2017. Figured it better to reduce the cost so more people can take advantage of its contents.

So if you are in need of some more exam question practice before you sit for the PMP exam, use coupon code ‘success10′ at https://www.thecrowdtraining.com/product-page/success-pmp-exam-questions-and-answers-5th-ed

New The Crowd Training Website!

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So excited to announce the launch of my new website! The URL for The Crowd Training’s website is https://www.thecrowdtraining.com

I created the site to share my project management games, drawings, apps, videos, and upcoming Project Management Professional PMP certification exam prep course. The Project Management Professional course – which I will just refer to as PM6 because it is based on the upcoming rollout of the PMBOK 6th edition from the Project Management Institute – is an fully interactive online training course. This course will fulfill your 35 hour project management training requirement for the PMI application. I am quite excited about it because it will truly be interactive and self paced. Too many of the online training courses I have had to sit thru have been either people reading PowerPoint slides or actors standing in front of a green screen reading cue cards or PowerPoint slides. Trying to endure that mundane monotony for hours upon hours is too much. It is no surprise students do not finish their online courses. My goal is to shake that up. Make it more concise and navigable. Put the power in the learner’s hands. Let the learner control the learning and be successful.

That PM6 project has been in the works for months and still has a couple more months of work to go. That full PMP interactive online prep course is currently slated for a September 2017 release. Ergo, the site currently offers a series of games that have been concurrently created for PMBOK 5th edition and 6th edition. I wanted to get the PMBOK 5th edition learning games out there to assist anyone planning to sit for the 5th edition of the PMP exam before the changeover at the start of 2018.

The project management games based on the 5th edition of the PMBOK are available for download or as a subscription. A subscription gives you full access to the entire library of project management games I have created… as well as any new games I develop! Any game published before and during your subscription period is made available to you. This is really a great option for those unsure if you want to sit for the 5th edition version of the PMP exam or the 6th edition. Subscribing to a $49 lifetime access gives you all the games now and in the future. At this moment, there are approximately 16 games available. More are being finalized and uploaded in the coming weeks. Once the games surpass the 30 game mark, the $49 lifetime subscription price will increase. Anyone claiming the current price will be granted that price forever. The 30 day and 90 day access fees will also shift accordingly. More about the games and pricing can be found here: http://www.thecrowdtraining.com/games

Building Matrix Game Example of one of The Crowd Training games for the PMP exam. In this game, you must select the correct location on the building for the randomly presented process before the taxi drives across the road in front of the building! It is only a few seconds. A prepared PMP exam candidate should be able to do this. Are you fully prepared?

There are other games currently available with many more in the pipeline. If you have ideas or suggestions of possible new games you would like to see or topics to be covered in a learning game, post them in the comments below! We would love to hear your thoughts. Thanks!

Switching from Wunderlist to To-Do

I have been using Microsoft To-Do for about 2 months now. I migrated my Wunderlist content over to To-Do. Microsoft stated that the plan is to take what worked in Wunderlist and make it a part of To-Do. With Wunderlist sunsetting, I thought I would test the waters with To-Do.

So far, I have liked most of it. I do miss some of the features of Wunderlist – for example being able to share a list with others and enable them to view/edit/add to that list.  Also miss having subtasks for a task like a checklist. (MSFT has stated that these features are in the works to be released soon – not sure what ‘soon’ is, but I am anxious :))

I do like a new feature that was not in Wunderlist – My Day Review. Wunderlist has an “inbox”, but the “My Day” is better. I use the “To-Do” list as the equivalent to the Wunderlist Inbox. Then try to move just a handful of items at the start of the day to the My Day list (if I get those done, I will move more onto the list). What also is nice is at the start of the day, the My Day section lets you review what was and was not done yesterday. In the review, you can hit a button to add it to today’s My Day. Or check it off as done, in case you did not check it off when it was done. You can obviously also change/update the item details and due dates, as needed. But beyond that, My Day then pulls from your lists to suggest what you might want to work on today! Clicking the + icon adds it to today’s My Day, in addition to being able to manually add new To Do items.

When you add tasks in Outlook, they are also added to To-Do. This is helpful when you flag an email for follow up.

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This product will get better as they put more resources into it. For now, it is still worth relying on it for daily organization and productivity tracking. I would love to see Kanban type boards or ability to sort the items by weight – either priority or effort. And as a visual person, it would be mighty cool to see graphical representation of what I have completed or my history or what ‘piles’ of work still await me. I will also need to update my Windows Phone 8 to a 10 phone or some other OS to take advantage of the mobility of the tool.

That is a 2 month view. I shall loop back in another 6 months to let you know if I feel any different or if I have learned anything else to make myself more productive. And if there if no post in 6 months, that means I am NOT any more productive or organized!

The 6th edition of the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PBMoK 6)

The Project Management Institute (PMI) updates their Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) every few years – give or take. This is a wonderful thing. It would be arrogant to think that every best practice of project management was captured precisely in the first try and thinking that practices and the profession does not change over time. Taking a look at the latest draft of the upcoming edition of the PMBOK, I am thinking that they are on the right track.

Personally, I have experienced the changeover from 3rd to 4th and 4th to the 5th. I was a full time project management instructor, developer, and author during those transitions. I was also one of the contributors to the 4th edition. Not that influences my impressions, but I do declare that move from the 3rd edition to the 4th edition was the most radical and beneficial. This was primarily due to the standardization of naming and structure. The process nomenclature was all over the board in third edition. The fourth edition set out to uniformly establish all processes with a VERB – NOUN structure. For instance Scope Planning became Plan Scope Management. Does not sound to drastic or earth-shattering, but as instructor attempting to get all my students to understand, memorize, and internalize all the vast amounts of content and exact naming, this was a major improvement.

Reading thru the sixth edition, there is not the major structural changes like those just mentioned. Nevertheless, there is obvious recognition of how our industry is maturing and expanding. There appears to be more attention given to all the various industries where our project management skills and methodologies are used and applied. This is most noticeable in terms of agile project management practices. As one certified in PMI’s Agile certification called the PMI-ACP, I welcome the inclusion of agile considerations in with the more traditional methods of project management. Naturally this demands more of project managers and those seeking the Project Management Professional (PMP) certification, but it is not out of line to ask for our PMPs to be more well rounded and obtain a broader knowledge base and tool bank in which to lead projects with. I equate everything contained in any edition of the PMBOK and the broader collective of what we expect a certified PMP to know is like a toolbox. A carpenter has his or her own toolbox that enables them to tackle various projects. Every project he or she works on is not going to require the same exact tools or strategies to meet the project’s objectives. Same with project managers. We need to have a toolbox. The more it contains, the more we have available to us. The more we comprehend the tools contained within, the more we are able to make the most appropriate decisions. Project management, like carpentry, requires skills, knowledge, and practice. And like any trade, we should expect the industry, the knowledge bank, and the technologies used to grow and evolve in hand.

So I fully embrace the upcoming changes to the Project Management Body of Knowledge. I am excited to train future and current project managers and PMP seekers on the 6th edition of the PMBOK. The PMBOK 6th edition is expected to be released later this year (2017) in the 3rd or 4th quarter.